Now that the vote is over, how will UK air strikes alter the Syria scene?

As UK warplanes bombard ISIS positions, the aim is to place greater pressure on the terrorist organisation and limit their capabilities within Syria and abroad. With the UK joining the US, Russia, France, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Iran, Iraq, Australia and others in the fight against ISIS, how has it changed the dynamics in Syria? Here we assess what UK …

UK air strikes, Syrian rivers of blood, and no dam in sight

The government has passed the motion permitting air strikes on ISIS positions in Syria by 397 to 223. The UK will join the US, Russia, Turkey, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and other nations already involved in Syria. The Prime Minister David Cameron delivered his argument as one of two choices; attack or wait to be attacked, a far cry from …

The UK has nothing to contribute via air strikes. Here’s why.

Behind the bravado, the exaggerated Andrew Neil-esque eulogies, the inferiority complex that cries out for the need for the UK to be a major global power, and the ambitions of a Prime Minister fearful that his premiership will go down as a relative unknown in history, the reality is that there is no plan, nor an understanding of the complexities in combating not just ISIS but resolving the crisis in Syria.

English Votes for English Laws: The new threat to our Union

EVEL is clearly flawed, and no other proposal seems viable. Surely, though, it’s better for the government to make an attempt to solve the West Lothian Question than just accept the status quo? Not really. The problem is that any attempt to answer the Question, much like trying to defuse a bomb, carries the risk of bringing about what you’re trying to prevent. In the case of the West Lothian Question, this is the break-up of the Union between England and Scotland.